What Legacy Will You Leave?

On Tuesday, I was checking Facebook at work. Now, I know I really shouldn’t be. But bear with me here. I had been doing some solid submission writing for a couple of hours. It’s mind-numbing stuff. So I just needed a moment to chill.

As I opened my Facebook app, I found that my friend Wendy Yapp had tagged me in a post. The post belonged to Rae-Helen Fisenden and it went something like this: “I’m looking for a new home for my books and CDs as I no longer have space for them. Does anyone want to collect them from my place?” And Wendy had tagged me.

I like to think it was more than the greedy Asian in me, but I immediately messaged Rae-Helen and offered to pick up the books and CDs. By that evening, I had ended up with a massive box of resources which Rae-Helen had collected over her years in ministry.

library

Rae-Helen is a pioneer musician, vocalist and worship leader in Perth. When she was worship pastor at Churchlands Vineyard, her live worship recording Winds of Worship 11 probably became the first internationally distributed worship album recorded in Perth. She has inspired many worship leaders in our city and taught many world-class musicians.

So, whilst I like books, but these were most than just books. These were books that have graced the shelves of a spiritual giant!

As I flicked through some of the books, there were highlighted passages, dog-earred pages – thoughts and ideas that have shaped Rae-Helen’s thoughts and from which she must have taught countless others. I felt that I was holding a mantle of anointing – a legacy gift – and it gave me goosebumps.

Rae-Helen told me that she was so glad she her prayers were answered – that she had found a good home for her collection so quickly and that her legacy could now be passed on.

What sort of legacy will you leave?

The way I see, God has his mind on “generations”. Psalm 71:17,18 says:

Since my youth, O God, you have taught me, and to this day I declare your marvelous deeds. Even when I am old and gray, do not forsake me, O God, till I declare your power to the next generation, your might to all who are to come.

Everything God has taught us or gifted us with, we are to declare now. But not just that. We must continue to declare them to the next generation, to those who are to come after us. This is the highest call of succession planning in the kingdom of God.

And then I think about the legacy that Christ has left us.

God’s law says in Deuteronomy 5:9 that God “punishes the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation.” In charismatic circles, we call this generational curses. Now, I for one don’t really understand why Christians like to build an entire doctrine around such a macabre subject.

But I don’t believe in generational curses. I believe in generational blessings!

In verse 11 of that same passage, God promises that He “shows love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments.”

No one has ever fulfilled the requirement of keeping all of God’s commandments, except Jesus. Romans 5:19 says that:

For just as through the disobedience of one man the many were made sinners, so also through the obedience of the one man the many will be made righteous.

By Christ’s perfect obedience, I am made a beneficiary of God’s blessings. I haven’t counted the number of generations that have passed since the time of Christ, but I am pretty sure I’m in one of the thousand generations!

What am I going to do with the books I inherited? Well, the first thing I did was give about a third of them away. A friend of mine had told me how one day he would like to start a library of Christian books. So now he’s got a pretty good start!

Then, I want to read the books I’ve kept, teach the principles I’ve learned to others, and ultimately pass the books onto others, but not just the books. I also want to pass the mantle that God has given me to the generation that comes after me!

 

 

Steppin’ Out: Reflections on Global Day of Worship

Global Day of Worship1

It’s now the 364th day of the year (sorry I started writing this on 30th December and I’m only finishing it on the 31st).

Today, I was challenged as I went to New Creation Church (I’m in Singapore at the moment) for the final service of 2012. I was there during the first service of the year (watching it via livefeed in a movie cinema) on 1 January 2012 when Pastor Joseph Prince announced the theme for the year: Unceasing Fruitfulness.

Today, the challenge was from Psalm 90:12 – that God might teach us to number our days because there will be days that aren’t lived for God and which will be completely lost. God can (and does) redeem those days that were lost, but only in today’s terms.

I can say that 2012 has been a year filled with God’s fruitfulness in my life.

One of the highlights for me was the privilege of being able to organise Global Day of Worship for Perth this year.

The story was one of God’s orchestration, because frankly, I had never organised something like this before.

It all started a few months earlier as I was on Facebook posting a photo (as I often do) of something I was about to eat. At that moment, my friend Wendy Yapp Facebook-messaged me and joined me into a conversation with Global Day of Worship director, Eunice Barruel.

Within minutes of our chatting to each other (via the keyboard and my dessert’s subsequent melting) we struck a chord and Eunice asked if I could coordinate GDW in Perth.

I was hesitant at first.

I’m sure you’ve all had that feeling – when faith and doubt fight it out and you are left really not sure of what to do. So I said to Eunice that if I could get a team together, then I would do it.

When I said “team”, I meant “musicians and worship leaders”, which really was quite short-sighted of me. Not long after, it became quite apparent that the task was bigger than just getting musicians together to facilitate worship: there was venue hire, logistics, marketing and a whole lot of other peripheral (but important) things to organise too.

But within a week, some of the core group of musicians had agreed and so I guess I had to eat my words and commit to organising GDW.

One of the things I learnt was that sometimes we need to just step out in faith. Hebrews 11:8 says that “by faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going.”

I think we seldom understand the gravity of what Abraham was doing. If you think about it, it was much more than a man going after God’s promise by faith. Can you imagine what Abraham must have gone through?

  • He was being asked to change his religion.
  • He was being asked to abandon his culture.
  • He had to leave behind his extended family and his property.
  • He had to move a lot of people and possessions; presumably he had to explain himself to a lot of people who were questioning what he was going to do.

And for what? The writer of Hebrews says that Abraham had no idea where he was going. He just knew that God had promised him a city with foundations whose architect and builder is God. And so, in faith, Abraham stepped into the unknown. In that same step, he also left everything that was known.

I’m not saying that I have experienced anything that dramatic, but organising GDW was a step of faith. I had no idea how it would work out. People used to ask me “how many people are you expecting to come?” and I would say, “I have no idea. I haven’t even really thought about it. I suppose, a hundred?”

But beyond just a worship event, and beyond the fact that we would be participating in a world-wide 24-hour continuum of praise, I believed that GDW had to be something which was also a step towards unity amongst worshippers in the city.

So part of the process of assembling the team was also about getting musicians and worship leaders from different churches involved.

We had some anointed worship leaders with whom I had worked in the past, but then more prominent worship leaders came on board, including Mel and Daron Crothers and Michael Battersby. In the end, there were musicians from 10 different churches on the team. This was only something God could have done!

And I believe that this is just a stepping stone to further expressions of unity amongst worshippers in our city.

As GDW drew near, I was re-reading some of my old posts, and I came across this in my very first post:

Even though we had doubts when we stepped out, like Peter we sensed the voice of Jesus steadying our steps and keeping us from sinking.

We’ve also felt the call to unite chuches in worship. Can it happen?

I didn’t know what to expect when I wrote that on 4 December 2011.  But just a year and 150 posts later, God showed me that it can happen!

I could not for a moment imagine that on the night of GDW, over 250 people from different churches would show up in passionate, rousing worship and intercession, inviting the rule and reign of God into our city.

It was more than the night of course: it was also the brothers and sisters from different congregations appearing out of the woodwork, offering help with planning, promotion, advice, logistical support and prayer cover. It was indeed a team effort!

If there was any doubt that God was a covenant-keeping God who is able to fulfill his pomises and plans, one of the worship leaders also shared with me before one of our rehearsals a passage of Scripture that (unbeknownst to her) had been a life theme that I had carried ever since I was baptised in 1991. It was from Jeremiah 1:5-10:

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you,
before you were born I set you apart;
I appointed you as a prophet to the nations.”

“Alas, Sovereign Lord,” I said, “I do not know how to speak; I am too young.”

But the Lord said to me, “Do not say, ‘I am too young.’ You must go to everyone I send you to and say whatever I command you. Do not be afraid of them, for I am with youand will rescue you,” declares the Lord.

Then the Lord reached out his hand and touched my mouth and said to me, “I have put my words in your mouth. See, today I appoint you over nations and kingdoms to uproot and tear down, to destroy and overthrow, to build and to plant.”

This passage was actually prophesied over me during my baptism by the mother of one of the worship leaders on our team 21 years ago. The next I heard it declared over me was in 2007 when I led a mission team to Japan to conduct a worship seminar. And now, here was the verse again. I knew that what we were doing with GDW was not only significant for the city, but it also significant for the nations.

To hear that Word released at such an opportune time was overwhelming – I sensed that God was reassuring me even in the moments when I was constantly asking the questions: who am I? and why am I even doing this?

I have a lot more to share about GDW, but I will probably leave it for another day.

But I will conclude with this: we are all on journeys and I have definitely not arrived by any sense of the word. But I’m glad that God often marks our lives with milestones to remind us that He has plans for us and that He will fulfill the dreams He puts in our hearts. Being part of GDW was one of those moments.

Here’s the video again if you missed the event:

Photograph courtesy of DTW Photography and Darren WoonVideo courtesy of Peter Liddicoat and Visual Reality Productions.

How Do We Have Great Faith?

Someone gave me a bookmark once which had a little sample of mustard seeds laminated onto it. I was surprised how tiny the mustard seeds were.

In Matthew 17:20, Jesus said “if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there’ and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you”.

Really? How can an extremely tiny amount of faith (mustard seed-size) cause such a tremendous result (moving mountains)?

I am currently reading Tim Keller’s new book Center Church and he makes this observation about faith and salvation (which I think is equally applicable to whatever circumstances we might be facing):

It is not the quality of the faith itself that saves us; it is what Jesus has done for us. It is easy to assume that being “saved by faith” means that God will now love us because of the depth of our repentance and faith. But that is to once again subtly make ourselves our own Savior rather than Jesus. It is not the amount of our faith but the object of our faith that saves us. 

Imagine two people boarding an airplane. One person has almost no faith in the plane and the crew and is filled with fears and doubts. The other has great confidence in the plane and the crew. They both enter the plane, fly to a destination, and get off the plane safely. One person had a hundred times more faith in the plane than the other did, but they were equally safe. It wasn’t the amount of their faith but the object of their faith (the plane and crew) that kept them from suffering harm and arriving safely at their destination.

After I read that, it clicked.

We can have the smallest amount of faith, as long as we act on it (in this example, get onto the plane). When we do that, the result is entirely up to God because it is not the volume of our faith, but the Person in whom we place our faith that matters.

That’s why even a tiny amount of faith in God can cause mountains to move.

Recently, I was asked to organise the Global Day of Worship here in Perth. Of course, Wendy Yapp encouraged me to do it, but all I knew was that it was important that worshippers throughout the city join together to form a stream for unity. To be honest, I was daunted by the task of organising the event. I just like to worship together with other people, and I could happily just slip in and be part of someone else’s event. But to actually organise something myself – well, that made me feel so, uh, responsible.

And to be honest, I didn’t have much faith. I said to the team when we met up recently that I’d be happy if even a handful of people showed up. I was sharply and rightly rebuked! My teammates said I should expect the auditorium to be filled and that in fact, I should expect it to overflow until people would have to be turned away or might have to worship from outside. And the troops rallied around to try to make this vision into reality.

Now, just a couple of weeks later, all sorts of things are happening with promoting the event that I could not even have planned for or dreamt about. A Christian bookstore, a Christian radio station and some well connected network leaders are all on board to promote the event. Other Christians in the city have come alongside me to offer their help. It’s just been an amazing journey.

Elsewhere in the gospels, Jesus said that the mustard seed might be the smallest of seeds, but when it grows, it is the largest of garden plants (Mt 13:31,32).

How you start may not always be how you end up. If we place our faith in God, no matter how much (or little) our faith, God is able to produce the results. It’s all about Him, not about us!

Lessons I Have Learned From Converge

Last night, the various Converge facilitators and leaders met for a debrief. It was a great time reflecting on the highlights, things we could change and do better, but above all reflecting on God’s faithfulness in taking the church in the city one step towards fulfilling Jesus’ prayer for unity.

In that same reflective mode, I want to share in this post some of the things I personally learnt through my involvement in Converge.

1. God’s grace is sufficient

God’s grace redeemed us, and God’s grace continues to empower us! As I shared in my previous post, the grace of God strengthens us in our weakness and allows us to take our limitations in our stride.

Just a couple of days before the Day of Worship, I had taken the day off work to do a bit of last minute planning, only to wake up with the beginnings of a cough and sore throat! I mentally did the math and realised the worst of it was going to surface on Saturday itself – i.e. the Day of Worship! And then I did some more maths and figured out that I would have to sing for nearly five hours on the day! I didn’t like where this equation was heading.

As all good mature Christians do, I started freaking out. And then I started doing some positive confession. And then I tried to expel as much phlegm as I possibly could (perhaps that last point was a bit of overshare!). Despite all my efforts, I woke up early on Saturday morning with a bad cough and a clogged up throat.

What was quite amazing however was that whenever I sang, my voice held up. I didn’t cough and sputter throughout both sessions and during the entire 5 hours of singing. As soon as I stopped however, I started to cough again.

The fact that my voice held up could only have been by the grace of God. His grace truly was sufficient!

2. Great worship doesn’t depend on the best musicians; it requires competent musicians who can play well together and are united in purpose.

As we were sharing our thoughts post-Converge, Gabriel Tan (one of the worship leaders during the morning session) made an interesting comment. He was actually the only professional musician in our group. This is what he said:

We’re ALL not music superstars. Just adequate musicians who like The Beatles, somehow managed to work REALLY REALLY well together. I’ve played in worship bands full of killer church musicians (MDs, worship pastors) before, and trust me, those times were good but no where near where we were at yesterday. The want to just offer whatever little we have to God, coupled with zero egos, makes for a very powerful thing.

Amen to that! Which leads me to my next point.

3. God blesses our unity with His flow of life.

Psalm 133 says that when believers dwell together in unity, that is where God ordains eternal life!

One of the most amazing phenomenon that happened during the “Hear the Nations Worship” night was the number of people who came in off the streets to observe, and even, participate in our worship.

This was something I only found out about later. To be frank, I was on stage most of the night and feeling quite tired. We struggled with some of the musical elements so I felt a touch discouraged. But Wendy and Bobby who were standing at the door greeted streams of people who came in off the streets, drawn to the sound of united worship. Some even asked whether we do this every Saturday night!

In the mid-1990’s, Sally Morgenthaler introduced the idea of “worship evangelism”. Her thesis was that seekers were spiritually hungry. But the church was just rolling out worship that was tantamount to slick, consumer-focussed productions. She says essentially that when the church returns to authentic worship anchored in truth, then the seekers will come.

I had never had a real chance to test that theory, and I assumed that 20 years later, that thesis had simply “moved on” as a relic of worship theology. During Converge, I saw some substance to the thesis. Worship evangelism is alive and well! Seekers are still hungry for the presence of God, and it is for the church to be a royal priesthood, ministering and mediating God’s presence to a lost world.

4. You can never overprepare

Working with two different bands during Converge, I observed two staggeringly different phenomena. At the risk of oversimplifying, in one band, we rehearsed everything to a tee. We worked out the intros and outros, variations in the drum beats, “power pauses” etc. In the other band, everyone was happy to go with the flow.

I said to Clement our drummer that I was more used to just getting the feel of a song right, rather than trying to plan every single part of the song. Clem responded by saying that it was better to overprepare, so that at least if you needed to do something like an outro, you could – rather than to not prepare it and not be able to do it. That made a lot of common sense.

Put another way: if it’s not in your bag, you can’t pull it out and use it. By not preparing, we are restricting ourselves.

On Pentecost Sunday, I was invited to lead a 5 minute worship slot during the Global Day of Prayer. I was handed a runsheet that spanned over 10 pages. It was astoundingly brilliant, so much so that I have kept it as a souvenir to remind myself of the power of planning. The entire two and a half hours was planned down to the minute, with different stage managers ushering different prayer leaders onto the stage at just the right time and the video and projection all lining up perfectly.

I was really inspired to be a more thorough organiser!

5. You don’t get out of your depth, you just gain more height

All throughout the planning stages of Converge, I felt horribly out of my depth. I had never been involved in anything like this before, I was not even leading worship in my church, and yet I was asked to bring together worship ministries to deliver an entire day of worship.

(I still feel horribly out of my depth to this day!)

One of the things Wendy Yapp said to me was that I was never out of my depth, rather I had learnt to jump higher. There is such wisdom in that thought!

I have pondered this a lot more since Converge finished. I suppose what Wendy was saying was that our depth is what anchors us in the first place. Without depth of character, we would easily fall. But depth allows us to reach higher than we have reached before. And sure, we might feel a bit of vertigo, but ultimately, we are secure in God’s purposes.

6. From celebratory unity to functional unity to visible unity

One last thought: Converge is an essential move of God in this city because it operates at the level of functional unity.

For years now, the city of Perth has had an event called “Church Together” during which hundreds of different churches would gather on a particular day to worship together and hear a message. Beyond that however, very little relationship is formed (except perhaps between the people who work together “on stage”). This is a species of celebratory unity. Celebratory unity is important because it inspires us to dream big about the possibilities of unity. However, it is only a first step.

Converge occupies the important grassroots level of functional or relational unity. Most of us involved in Converge weren’t leaders in any churches, just ordinary Christians who felt called by God to be instruments of unity in this city. We worked at a relational level to span church, denominational and ministry boundaries.

I believe that one day, there will be a convergence of celebratory and functional unity to bring visible unity to the church in the city. Then the church will truly be an answer to Jesus’ high priestly prayer, that as we are one, the world will know that Jesus was sent of the Father. May that day come during our lifetime!

Converge 2012 – One Heart, One Voice

It’s been a pretty full-on couple of months for me helping out with the Converge organising committee. Never in my life would I have thought that I’d be trying to bring in worship teams from all over the city for the one purpose of exalting the name of Jesus over our City.

There have been times when I have wondered whether we could ever get teams from different churches to lead worship from morning to night, but I am glad to say that between Wendy Yapp, Shaw, Judy and myself and a good deal of help from the Lord, we’ve finally gotten there!

Last week, I was still looking for an African team. I tried calling one guy but never got any response. Then out of the blue, Stephanie Truscott called me and said that Arlene Gregory (who was experienced in leading African worship) really wanted to participate. Within minutes of hanging up the phone on Stephanie, Arlene called me and asked if she could bring a team! I didn’t even need to do anything, but God orchestrated it all!

The idea of bringing worship teams together from different churches in the city is spiritually significant.

Romans 15:5-7 (NIV) says:

May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you a spirit of unity among yourselves as you follow Christ Jesus, so that with one heart and one voice you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Accept one another, then, just as Christ accepted you, in order to bring praise to God.

Check out the Message version:

May our dependably steady and warmly personal God develop maturity in you so that you get along with each other as well as Jesus gets along with us all. Then we’ll be a choir—not our voices only, but our very lives singing in harmony in a stunning anthem to the God and Father of our Master Jesus!

So reach out and welcome one another to God’s glory. Jesus did it; now you do it!

This is why we are calling the Converge Day of Worship on 26 May 2012 “One Heart, One Voice”. As I have said before in previous posts, throughout history, the Church has found reason to divide itself over worship styles and theologies. And yet, Jesus was determined that His church would be one to glorify the Father. As Paul puts it, may we be as “one heart and one voice” to glorify God.

In this sense, God is not just exalted in the songs we sing and the words we say. He is also exalted (and moreso) when the body of Christ can look past their differences and unite, for no other sake than for the sake of unity and the glory of His name.

So my prayer for Converge 2012, and for the Day of Worship, is that the church may join together as one big choir, not just our voices only, but our very lives singing in harmony in a stunning anthem to God.

Check out the program that’s just about to be released (the fruit of the labour of many people on the organising committee over the last couple of months)

Converge Flyer

We’ve got an African team led by Arlene Gregory, Flame Ministries, an Indigenous Team led by Eric Wynne, Salvation Army, Stephanie Truscott and the Garments of Praise doing American Gospel, Without Walls, Indonesian Worship led by Aflame Community Church and two inter-church teams as well! It’ll be an awesome day!

Converge 2012: Knit Together

It’s been amazing how God has led me here.

About 7 years ago, I met Pastor Yoy Alberastine in a cafe to talk about worship and the city. We must have sat there for about 4 hours just dreaming about what it would be like if worship leaders across the city connected together. The spiritual implications would be huge. Yoy had some personal involvement in something like this in the Love Singapore movement, but could it be done in Perth?

As things go, I got too busy with my own ministry to even pursue that dream. The dream got shelved like those books you buy but never get around to reading, but every now and then it catches your eye as a gentle reminder that it’s still there.

Last year, I had the privilege of being part of the Commonwealth Prayer Initiative which saw a huge number of churches get together in a 24/7 prayer movement (known as Converge) over the week that CHOGM came to Perth. It was a foretaste of what could be achieved when the church of Perth stands in unity.

This year, I found myself on the organising committee of Converge 2012 to help organise the program for one of the days: an entire day devoted to worship and magnifying God in the city. On the one hand, I’m excited because it’s like God reminding me to finally dust off that dream and start getting into it. But to say I’m daunted by the task is to put it mildly.

The theme for this year’s Converge is “Knit Together”. It takes its inspiration from Colossians 2:2:

[For my concern is] that their hearts may be braced (comforted, cheered, and encouraged) as they are knit together in love, that they may come to have all the abounding wealth and blessings of assured conviction of understanding, and that they may become progressively more intimately acquainted with and may know more definitely and accurately and thoroughly that mystic secret of God, [which is] Christ (the Anointed One).

True unity in the church can only be achieved when the hearts of God’s people are “knit together”; intertwined. It is the key not only to abounding wealth and blessings (which in this context is secondary), but ultimately to knowing and being intimately acquainted with Christ. As John says, we can’t really say we love God unless we love our brothers and sisters.

Christ and His grace is the mystery of God hidden through the ages, but revealed through His body – the church. Paul says in Ephesians 3:8ff:

Although I am less than the least of all the Lord’s people, this grace was given me: to preach to the Gentiles the boundless riches of Christ, and to make plain to everyone the administration of this mystery, which for ages past was kept hidden in God, who created all things. His intent was that now, through the church, the manifold wisdom of God should be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms…

Through the church, united and knit together, God displays His manifold wisdom to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realm.

I believe that as the church joins together in apostolic worship and intercession, God will make a statement to the spiritual realm of this city that Perth belongs to Jesus and that the gates of hell will not prevail against the church.

So seven years later, it seems that God is leading me to take steps of faith towards seeing the dream of the church being united in worship. It’s not going to take just one event to make it happen, but at least the process has started and the future is glorious.

Blessings Reel – February 2012

I’m a few days late, but reflecting on the month that’s passed, I am amazed by the goodness of God in our lives.

As I have said, this year is the year of Unceasing Fruitfulness. And like the Tree of Life in the book of Revelations which bears twelve different types of fruit, we can expect twelve different manifestations of blessings each month of 2012.

A fruit has its origin in the seed. Once the seed is planted, it germinates and grows into a tree. When the tree is mature, it begins to bear fruit. The DNA of the fruit however is in the seed. In other words, an apple seed can only bring forth apples.

Our seed however is Christ, for in Him and through Him and to Him are all things.

Galatians 3 says that Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us, for “cursed is everyone who is hung on a tree” (v13). Paul goes on to say that Christ redeemed us in order that we might receive the blessing of Abraham.

In verses 16ff, Paul says:

The promises were spoken to Abraham and to his seed. The Scripture does not say “and to seeds”, meaning many people, but “and to your seed”, meaning one person, who is Christ.

The blessings of obedience to the law is now available to us through the Seed, i.e. Christ, not because of anything we can do, but because of God’s grace through faith. So we can expect to receive blessings of health and healing, prosperity, peace, salvation, favour, divine help, guidance, wisdom, God’s presence, joy etc through Christ, the originator of all blessing.

For me February has been a month of closures. On one day at work, I had three complicated cases come to closure, the most spectacular of which was a guy who had claimed that he was a victim of domestic violence at the hands of his ex-wife. When the Immigration Department assessed his claims, they said that he did not have a strong case. To be honest, I didn’t think he had a strong case. But I responded to the Department’s concern the best I could. After several weeks, I was still not optimistic; I thought his case could be rejected at any time. But to my surprise, and quite miraculously, the Department agreed with my submissions and granted him permanent residency. He was so happy he started telling everyone what a great day it was, including the guy who made us coffee at the coffee shop!

But the greatest closure for us was the fact that we had finally found a church to belong to after 7 months of wandering. And we sense that as one chapter closes, a new door has opened for us in Faith Community Church and we are excited as to what the future holds.

So I’m thankful to God for the blessing of new beginnings.

As we move forward in this chapter, I want to finish off this post by acknowledging some wonderful people who have walked alongside us, supported us, encouraged us and dialogued with us over the last 7 months, in no particular order: Ps Daniel Ho, Ps Judy Low, Shaw Cheong, Wai Kin and Anna, Joanna and Dan, Bernard and Vicki, Pastor Yoy Alberastine, Pastor Binh Nguyen, Pastor Benny Ho, Wendy Yapp, Cao, Cindy, Joe, Jos, Louis, Mons, Stephanie Truscott, Derwin, Derek, Jenn Yong, Joy, Samson, Addie, Sharon, Adrian and June, Esther, Matthias, Dave and Yvonne, Juls, Jade, Esther, Bryan, Clem, Drew, Amy, Alan, Adrian, Matt, Jess, Pastor Koon Hee and Jin, Darren, Chi Yen, Edmund and Sharon and so many more of our friends who had coffee with us, hung out with us, served with us and just generally poured into our lives during this last season: even if it was just over a meaningful meal together. We learnt a lot and heard your hearts. Thanks so much for sharing in the journey!